BOMBSHELL! Hillary Clinton Pedophile Sex Ring Continues to be Exposed by Insiders

 

The following is a compilation of reports associated to the latest leaks about Hillary Clinton’s involvement with pedophile sex. There are now multiple sources from the FBI and NYPD confirming Hillary Clinton’s massive crime syndicate in Washington DC.  Is this the take down of the cabal taking place right in front of our eyes or is this a disinformation campaign?

https://youtu.be/os4S–dRB-U

Source: Victurus Libertas 

All of the following information was given to us by our insiders who have specific first-hand knowledge of the Hillary Clinton email scandal. It seems that things are about to heat up. We are told that of the 662,871 emails lifted from Anthony Weiner’s computer, 11,112 emails are Huma Abedin’s… and pay to play – including Saudis and Israelis. Meaning Huma was the one Hillary USED to communicate with foreign leaders via email for inside information and deals via Huma’s computer.

It has been established through many avenues, but mainly through Wikileaks, that the Clinton Foundation was just a farce set up in order to perform pay-to-play games with multiple entities, including foreign nations. Pay-to-play nations include: Israel, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Qatar, Kazakhstan, and the Ukraine. 

Furthermore, we are told by one of our insiders that one email unequivocally confirms ISIS was created by CIA and Israeli Secret Intelligence Servicewith help from Joe Lieberman, John McCain, and Lindsey Graham!

An NYPD insider said the content they viewed did include State Department TOP SECRET emails. One file was called “Life Insurance”. A second file was titled “DNC Nuclear Arsenal“.

A third file I’m sure Hillary definitely DOES NOT want released was a file labeled “Intimate”… according to this NYPD insider, this file contained X-rated photos of Huma and Hillary with a TEENAGER.

NYPD detectives were sickened by what they saw, according to our insider, and they had threatened FBI field agents that they would leak this information, if the FBI did not “step up and take off the kid gloves”. At that point, 13 of the FBI agents in NYC were also threatening to leak the information.

As you can imagine, the scandal has the entire Obama Administration in full panic. We are told there are emails that could send Loretta Lynch to prison, as well as Bill and Hillary. The Twitter post below, our sources sent us, verifying it is all true:

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Even MORE! 

The following information comes straight from an FBI Anonymous source, who is the senior analyst who posted on 4chan in early July of this year: 

Jim Comey learned that some of his own investigators were tipping off both Loretta Lynch and Bill Clinton, thus making his job impossible.

Comey sent a letter to Congress, knowing that ultimately it would expose Loretta Lynch as a dirty actor and the breadcrumbs would lead directly to Obama. The State Department is terrified now. Comey has assembled a small team of 40 agents, whom he has declared “The Untouchables” after the famous federal agent Eliot Ness.

Comey has clamped down on all FBI agents and he expects a full-scale war between the FBI and the Department of Justice (DOJ), the White House, and the State Department. He has confirmed and understands that many sitting senators, congressmen, lobbyists, and power players are going to be indicted and prosecuted. One of the main targets of the probe is the Clinton Foundation and Clinton Global Initiative. Among the targets under investigation are John Podesta, Huma, Cheryl Mills, CNN, ABC, NBC, etc.

As it turns out, Weiner, Huma’s husband, had been forwarding Huma’s emails each time she came home and left her computer open. Huma appears to have been in touch with Saudi actors, and therefore, ESPIONAGE is strongly suspected.

Comey and his 40 “Untouchables” are now preparing to take down the largest corruption ever witnessed in American history… which is what I think MUST happen if Comey is planning to stay part of the FBI. He lost so much respect and so much credibility with the first Hillary investigation, it would take something of this magnitude to allow him to face the public again.

The Pentagon has internal players and outside players they call “creatives“. Creatives are civilians who tend to be geniuses, malcontents, extreme hackers, or otherwise demonstrate brilliance in other useful areas. A Pentagon program called Cicada 3301, which we have reported on previously, was created by several of these talented civilians. The program is now used to allow thousands of honest government people to report on their corrupt superiors, using what is called a DEAD BOX whistleblower encryption method so the non-corrupted government officials can report corruption and still remain safe.

I’ve heard it said “A vagina almost took down Bill, now will a Weiner take down Hillary?” LOL!

Again, thank you to all of the insiders, the whistleblowers, the good FBI agents, the good CIA agents, the good NYPD officers, and the non-corrupted government officials who want to see the truth exposed! Without these brave, wonderful, and morally erect individuals, our country would still be in the corrupted darkness.

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Vistors to Epstein’s Little St. James Island include:

• Ehud Barak, the former Prime Minister of Israel (1999-2001) – pedophile being procured underage girls by Epstein. Former Israeli Minister of Defense and also Deputy Israeli Prime Minister under Binyamin Netanyahu from 2009 to 2013.

• Prince Andrew – British royalty – Jeffrey Epstein and his girlfriend Ghislaine Maxwell pimped Epstein sex slave Virginia Roberts to Prince Andrew multiple times. The victim girls say Prince Andrew was very sexually sadistic; they despised this sick, twisted creature.

• Kevin Spacey – actor in House of Cards. People tell me Spacey is gay, and my response is “Have you ever heard of the word bisexual?” Spacey is very good friends with 2 big-time pedophiles: Jeffrey Epstein and Bill Clinton. Spacey, big Hollywood star, has 3.78 million Twitter followers.

• Alan Dershowitz – longtime friend of Epstein, as well as one of his defense lawyers. Dershowitz was the one who negotiated that absurd plea bargain for Epstein that gave him a 13-month (served) sentence and a 16 hour/day day pass so he could spend most of his time in his mansion. Epstein sex slave Virginia Roberts has said that Epstein made her have sex with Dershowitz numerous times. The real question is how many other underage girls was Dershowitz having sex with? Virginia Roberts says Dershowitz also witnessed Epstein’s pedophilic activities.

http://victuruslibertas.com/2016/10/insiders-reveal-sex-ring/

Related:

Abel Danger – “FBI INSIDER” – Clinton Foundation Scandal Would Bring Down the Government and More  
The Situation Is So Intense, It Involves the Entire US Government | FBI Insider  
*EXPLOSIVE* Q & A on the Clinton Foundation – FBI Insider on 4chan /pol/ : “Ask Me Anything About the Clinton Case” – George Soros Is the Kingpin – Follow the Rothschild Thread – Clinton Foundation Uses People as Currency – Jeffrey Epstein’s Child Sex Trafficking Network – Bill & Hillary Clinton Get Paid in Money & Children – Hammer HRC’s E-mails, Dig Into the CF: Post Everywhere You Can  

ISIS stands for “Israeli Secret Intelligence Service”

https://youtu.be/X9jMAy5j5BE

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BREAKING: SEARCH WARRANT LEADING TO RE-OPENING OF CLINTON CASE WAS FOR CHILD PORNOGRAPHY

 

 

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Kent Dunn Speaks of a lot of Inside Information about Coruption in US GOV to Spread Abroad !

https://youtu.be/-5yAcG4JofU

*Discernment Advised Until Proven 

Notes written by AscensionWithEarth.Com 

This update is in regards to the private emails of Hillary Clinton and Huma Abedin found on the computer of Huma’s pedophile husband, Anthony Weiner.

The files in the folder named “Life Insurance” contained emails that revealed bombshell evidence that Hillary Clinton and Huma Abedin are running a pedophile sex ring.  Out of the 650,000 emails on Anthony Weiner’s computer, 11,112 emails are specifically related to Huma.

Kent Dunn says there is information regarding the true founders of ISIS terrorist group.  ISIS was created by the CIA in collaboration with the Israeli Mossad. The inventors of ISIS are Joe LiebermanJohn McCain, and Lindsey Graham.

There are three files that are in the folder labeled “Life Insurance” , one of which is called ‘DNC Nuclear Arsenal’. The second file is labeled ‘Intimate XXX’, which contains naked pictures of Huma Abedin, Hillary Clinton, and a teenage girl having sex.  Third file was mentioned previosly about how ISIS was created by members of the USA Corp and Israeli Mossad.

The FBI set up a sting against the Department of Justice (DOJ).  The sting set up Bill Clinton and Attorney General Loretta Lynch in Phoenix, Arizona which they had a secret meeting on the tarmac of Mrs. Lynch’s airplane.  FBI workers leaked information to Bill Clinton that Loretta Lynch was going to be at the airport in Phoenix.  This is how Bill Clinton knew that AG Lynch was going to be at the airport at that specific time and date.

Speculation now is that the FBI and Department of Justice are now in an internal war about the leaks of the new emails found on Huma’s and Anthony Wiener’s computer.   Many people are connected with the latest email scandal as the Obama administration personnel were using private emails servers outside of the sanctioned government servers.  They were passing classified information though private emails.  Senators, Representatives, and lobbyists, including John Podesta, and Huma. The emails revealed that they were communicating with media broadcast companies NBC, ABC, CBS for the purpose of denying the American people from using the Freedom Information Act/ FOIA Requests of the private emails from Hillary and Huma’s computer.  The whole thing is setup under a code name called “SOCIGA3301”.

Kent Dunn: Sir what is going to happen with the election?
Military Colonel: “When we’re done, what election?”

New York Police Department is aware of the emails and are “absolutely livid”  NYPD are watching over FBI and have threatened the FBI if they don’t do something about these crimes they will take the responsibility of informing the public.  Revolt is brewing.

End of Video Intel

Notes written by AscensionWithEarth.Com 

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Hillary Clinton Child Rape Victim Speaks Out – BOMBSHELL Cathy O’Brien Testimony

https://youtu.be/2pzp6VR7zJ8

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CONSPIRACY OF SILENCE [Banned Discovery Channel Documentary]

Conspiracy of Silence, a documentary listed for viewing in TV Guide Magazine was to be aired on the Discovery Channel, on May 3, 1994. This documentary exposed a network of religious leaders and Washington politicians who flew children to Washington D.C. for sex orgies. Many children suffered the indignity of wearing nothing but their underwear and a number displayed on a piece of cardboard hanging from their necks when being auctioned off to foreigners in Las Vegas, Nevada and Toronto, Canada. At the last minute before airing, unknown congressmen threatened the TV Cable industry with restrictive legislation if this documentary was aired. Almost immediately, the rights to the documentary were purchased by unknown persons who had ordered all copies destroyed. A copy of this videotape was furnished anonymously to former Nebraska state senator and attorney John De Camp who made it available to retired FBI Agent Ted L. Gunderson. While the video quality is not top grade, this tape is a blockbuster in what is revealed by the participants involved.

Americans down on Obama's ISIS plan, high on Clinton's nat sec bona-fides

 
Published time: 23 Nov, 2015 20:08
 
Hillary Clinton and U.S. President Barack Obama. © Kevin Lamarque
Hillary Clinton and U.S. President Barack Obama. © Kevin Lamarque / Reuters
Most Americans think President Barack Obama has no sound strategy to counter jihadist group Islamic State, while Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has an upper hand on Republican rivals over "handling terrorism," a new poll found.

Obama and Clinton have long been associated with one another, beginning with their tense fight for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2008 and continuing into Obama's first presidential term, when Clinton served as secretary of state. Yet the pair are viewed very differently by Americans regarding their handling ‒ and, in Clinton's case, prospective handling ‒ of modern terrorism, according to separate polls.

Two-thirds of respondents to a new CBS News poll said that Obama has no coherent plan for countering Islamic State (IS, also known as ISIS or ISIL), with only 23 percent saying the president has offered a clear strategy for fighting the group. Islamic State controls large swaths of Syria and Iraq, and has begun making its presence known worldwide by taking credit for the Paris terror attacks of November 13 and for the bombing of a Russian charter jet last month.

In the same poll, half of respondents said the US should send ground troops to fight Islamic State, while 63 percent believe that such a deployment is inevitable. Only 20 percent believe airstrikes, the current weapon of choice for the US in dealing with Islamic State, will be successful in eliminating the group.

Last week, US airstrikes targeting Islamic State destroyed at least 116 trucks used by the organization to smuggle crude oil in Syria. Previous US policy was to damage but not destroy such targets, citing concerns about destroying Syrian infrastructure. The tanker-truck bombing was lauded as a success, and its effectiveness was attributed to better intelligence.

The Pentagon had previously justified the rules of engagement with Islamic State as necessarily strict to keep civilian casualties low. IS militants often hide in public places that would lead to significant collateral damage if hit by an airstrike. The Obama administration has come under heavy fire for the policy, with critics calling the rules too restrictive, noting the majority of US-led coalition aircraft return from their missions without dropping a single bomb.

Last week, Obama insisted that fighting Islamic State is different than conflict with another nation.

"We play into the ISIL narrative when we use routine military tactics that are designed to fight a state that is attacking another state,” he said from the Group of 20 summit in Turkey. "That's not what's going on here. These are killers with fantasies of glory who are very savvy when it comes to social media and are able to infiltrate the minds not just of Iraqis and Syrians but disaffected individuals around the world."

Obama added: "It's not their sophistication or the particular weaponry they possess but it is the ideology that they carry with them and their willingness to die."

Obama's former head diplomat, Clinton, received positive marks among respondents of a Washington Post/ABC News poll who were asked if they trusted Clinton or the various Republican candidates for president "to handle the threat of terrorism."

In individual comparisons, Clinton bested her potential opponents including Donald Trump (50-42), Ben Carson (49-40), Ted Cruz (48-40), Marco Rubio (47-43), and Jeb Bush (46-43). Nevertheless, the poll found that Clinton is the 2016 presidential race's most trusted candidate when it comes to global terrorism.

Like the CBS poll, the Post/ABC poll found the respondents discontent with Obama's actions against Islamic State and "terrorism" in general.

"Clinton’s position of strength in the new Post-ABC poll is perhaps more striking given it also found a record high 54 percent of Americans disapprove of the way Obama is handling terrorism, and 57 percent disapproved of his handling of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria," wrote Washington Post polling analyst Scott Clement. "Clinton owes her edge then, to a significant share of Obama detractors who nonetheless prefer her over Republicans."

Last week, Clinton gave her vision for countering Islamic State during a speech at the Council on Foreign Relations. She criticized Turkey's lack of action against IS while chastising US allies in the region, such as Saudi Arabia and Qatar, that must “carry their share of the burden."

When it came to actually fighting IS militants on the ground, Clinton’s prescriptions were familiar. She called for more planes and more bombs, more involvement by US special forces, and arming and equipping local proxies.

Gangs of New York: Sicilian mafia offers Big Apple protection from 'psychopathic' ISIS

 
Published time: 22 Nov, 2015 11:13
 
FILE: Gambino crime family associate Franco Lupoi is escorted by FBI agents from their Manhattan offices in New York February 11, 2014 © Brendan McDermid
FILE: Gambino crime family associate Franco Lupoi is escorted by FBI agents from their Manhattan offices in New York February 11, 2014 © Brendan McDermid / Reuters
The son of a New York mob boss has given Islamic State a stark warning, saying if they are planning any attacks in New York, they will have to contend with the Sicilian mafia. The notorious crime syndicate say they want to do their bit to protect locals.

Giovanni Gambino, the son of a key figure in the Gambino mob organization, says the mafia is in a much better position than security bodies, such as the FBI or Homeland Security, to give New Yorkers the protection they need. 

“They often act too late, or fail to see a complete picture of what's happening due to a lack of ‘human intelligence,’” he said in an interview with NBC News, as cited by Reuters, adding that the mafia’s knowledge of individual movements and interaction with locals gives it the upper hand, even compared to the latest surveillance technologies. 

Gambino, who is trying to carve out a career as a Hollywood screenwriter, says that, following the horrendous terror attacks in Paris on November 13, protection is more important than ever.

"The world is dangerous today, but people living in New York neighborhoods with Sicilian connections should feel safe," he said. "We make sure our friends and families are protected from extremists and terrorists, especially the brutal, psychopathic organization that calls itself the Islamic State,”

Gambino Jr, who was brought up in Torretta, a mountainous area overlooking Palermo, the capital of Sicily, says that Islamic State (formerly ISIS/ISIL) fear the Sicilian mafia, and this has been one of the main reasons why they have not tried to set up any underground cells in Sicily.

The Italian island has not suffered from any terrorist attacks and Gambino feels that the mafia can offer protection in New York to help curb the rise of the Islamist terror group and help people see the mob in a new light. 

"The mafia has a bad reputation, but much of that's undeserved," says Gambino, who moved to Brooklyn in 1988. "As with everything in life, there are good, bad and ugly parts – the rise of global terrorism gives the mafia a chance to show its good side."

Measure
Measure
 
 

8 Steps to Defeating ISIS

 
Supreme Allied Commander Europe (SACEUR) Admiral James Stavridis makes a speech at the departure ceremony for OTAN Rapid Deployable Corps - Italy bound for Afghanistan at Ugo Mara Barracks in Solbiate Olona, Italy, on Jan. 10, 2013.
Pier Marco Tacca—Getty Images Supreme Allied Commander Europe (SACEUR) Admiral James Stavridis makes a speech at the departure ceremony for OTAN Rapid Deployable Corps - Italy bound for Afghanistan at Ugo Mara Barracks in Solbiate Olona, Italy, on Jan. 10, 2013.

James Stavridis, a former NATO Commander and retired four-star Navy Admiral, serves at The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He is the author of the upcoming memoir The Accidental Admiral.

The former supreme commander of NATO says we must build a coalition and offer a plan of attack

As the world prepares its response to the recent trio of high visibility attacks by the Islamic State—destroying a Russian civilian airliner over the Sinai desert, blowing up a bustling marketplace in Lebanon, and multiple attacks in Paris—we will need a coalition campaign plan to respond effectively. No single nation has the will and the capability by itself to destroy the Islamic State.

The good news, such as it is, would be that ISIS has managed to infuriate much of the world through its strikes; as a direct result, creating a coalition to respond with military force is relatively easy in political terms. Indeed, the current coalition nominally has about 65 partners, according to the White House (although not even a third will likely actively participate in military operations at a significant level). Current or potential partners include the U.S., other NATO nations, countries with experience in Afghanistan (including Australia, New Zealand, Finland, Sweden, Georgia), Arab partners from the Sunni world, and even unconventional partners like Russia (and perhaps even Iran under certain circumstances).

The hard part will be drafting a military campaign plan to meld together disparate forces into a coherent fighting force. This will require cultural understanding, patience, ingenuity, determination and—above all—leadership. Each of the nations will probably come with so-called “caveats,” which will restrict their forces from certain activities. They will all have different capabilities, cultures, languages, supply systems, value sets and plenty of other differences. Coalition warfare is not for the faint of heart.

Ideally, NATO would lead the effort. The alliance has conducted extensive out-of-area combat operations over the past two decades in the Balkans, Iraq, at sea against piracy off the Horn of Africa, Libya, and above all for more than a decade in Afghanistan (where the alliance fielded more than 140,000 troops from 50 nations during my time as Supreme Allied Commander). For NATO to become the lead entity would require the 28 allied nations to all agree (as was the case in Afghanistan and Libya). Those conversations have not yet begun in earnest, but hopefully they will begin soon.

No matter the construct of the coalition—a coalition of the willing, a NATO-based operation, an E.U.- or U.N.-led mission, or some combination—there needs to be careful staff work to prepare the outlines of a successful campaign plan. This kind of thinking and planning is underway now in various capitals as military planners create options to present to civilian leaders. Here are some of the key elements that the leading planners should consider.

1. Establishing a robust and dependable command and control backbone.Without a defined chain-of-command, an integrated intelligence and targeting center, an operational command center with satellite entities in force concentration areas, a state of the art combined air operations center and an information technology system, the coalition campaign will be hamstrung from the start. The overall effort will need to be commanded by at least a 3-star General Officer (probably from the U.S.) with a capable and robust staff of several hundred experienced officers and senior enlisted. His deputy should be an international partner, with a senior Ambassador as a political advisor or even a civilian deputy.

2. Increasing intelligence sharing across the coalition.At the moment, the best intelligence is “owned” by the U.S. and shared via the so-called “Five Eyes” agreements to traditional partners like the U.K. Intelligence should be more broadly shared throughout the coalition, especially to technologically capable nations like France, Belgium, Denmark and the Nordics. We should also explore limited intelligence sharing with Russia and encourage our Arab partners to provide intelligence from what is, after all, their region.

3. Incorporating a strong cyber element into the plan. ISIS has shown increasing facility in the cyber world in three ways: recruiting and proselytizing on the Web; cybercriminal activity for profit; and operational command and control. We should vigorously attack them in all three dimensions. There needs to be a small cyber element forward to support the commander, perhaps 100 experts.

4. Creating a Coalition Special Operations Task Force as the forward boots on the ground. The NATO Special Operations Headquarters should build a campaign plan to provide intelligence, spotting for air strikes, raiding, and other traditional SpecOps capabilities. This will need to be at least several hundred operators, with aviation support and dedicated intelligence. All in, this would be in the range of 1,000 operators initially, with a 1-star commander.

5. Integrating with other government agencies.The Central Intelligence Agency and similar organizations have a reasonable level of operational capability that should be incorporated into the campaign plan. While not numerically overwhelming, they would bring niche capability in intelligence, targeting, raiding, and interrogation. The CIA should lead an international effort with a senior commander.

6. Setting up an effective training mission in Iraq.This is where we will need the greatest number of “boots on the ground,” and it would be the heart of the campaign plan. We would need between 15,000 and 20,000 U.S. and coalition troops to conduct two robust training missions, one centered with the Kurds in Irbil and the other with the Iraqi Security Forces in Baghdad. This should be multi-national, with a 3-star commander from the U.S. (who would provide about 60% of the forces) and a 2-star from one of the other leading national contributors.

7. Increasing the air campaign to broaden its base of targets and increase its tempo. We should set up an integrated, coalition-friendly Air Operations Center which could broadly support coalition forces, either in Turkey, the Gulf States or eventually forward in Baghdad. We will need a shared logistics and ordnance system to get more of our allies and other coalition partners into the fight. This Combined Air Operations Center should be commanded by a 2-star US Air Force Officer with a deputy from the second largest air contributor, probably France.

8. Bringing boots on the ground into the urban centers. After significant air operations to degrade ISIS (going after their sources of finance, electricity, water, transport, ordnance, logistics, training, and command and control), the campaign would need to move into the two key centers: Mosul (first) and then Raqqa. The campaign would operate on a three-axis approach: Kurds (and Yadzidi) from the north; bombing aggressively in the west and in tactical support of ground operations; and the Iraqi Security Forces from the south.

Hanging over everything like a dark shadow obscuring the sun is the Bashar al-Assad regime. Given Russian and Iranian sponsorship of Assad, there is not a purely military solution in the offing ahead of us; we will need the best work of our diplomats and political leaders to craft an agreement that eventually moves him out of power and establishes a path to democracy and justice. That appears a long way in the distance at the moment, but the talks in Vienna are a start.

All of this will take time. This would not be an insignificant effort by the U.S., nor would this be undertaken lightly by our friends. But hopefully the lessons of Iraq and Afghanistan will inform our efforts here, and we will succeed. The brutality, venality, and potential danger posed by ISIS justify the efforts. Let’s build a campaign plan, find the right mix of allies and partners, and go to work.

Admiral Stavridis retired in 2013 after serving four years as the 16th Supreme Allied Commander at NATO. He is today the 12th Dean of The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.

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Adele Cries toHer Music, Too

 

The British singer discusses the challenge of following up the success of“21,” how motherhood has changed her and why she avoids being a celebrity.

By JON PARELESNOV. 12, 2015

LONDON — “I’m not going to cry,” Adele said. She was practicing with her band at Music Bank rehearsal studios, an unglamorous warehouse space in South London, and had just finished “When We Were Young,” one of the torchiest ballads on her new album, “25.” It’s a song about running into an old flame that confesses, “I still care” and then, tentatively, asks, “Do you still care?”

Adele can get caught up in her own songs, and she wouldn’t want to change that. “In order for me to feel confident with one of my songs it has to really move me,” she said. “That’s how I know that I’ve written a good song for myself — it’s when I start crying. It’s when I just break out in [expletive] tears in the vocal booth or in the studio, and I’ll need a moment to myself.”

That heart-on-sleeve emotion, conveyed by a gorgeous voice, has made Adele, now 27, one of the most universally beloved singers and songwriters of the 21st century. Adele, whose last name is Adkins, won the Grammy as Best New Artist with her 2008 debut album, “19.” She multiplied her audience with “21,” her 2011 album full of breakup songs — angry, regretful, lonely, righteous — that used modern production touches around vocals filled with old-fashioned soul. It has sold 30 million albums worldwide, 11 million in the United States. Beyond the power of Adele’s voice and the craftsmanship of the music, “21” communicated a palpable sincerity and urgency, the feeling that its wounds were still fresh.

“She’s got this incredible intuition about what’s right and what’s real and what suits her,” said Paul Epworth, who wrote and produced songs with Adele on both “21” and the new album. “She’s the sharpest, most instinctive artist I’ve ever worked with. She’s pure gut, pure intuition.”

Photo
Adele Credit Alasdair McLellan

The question that loomed over Adele in her four years between albums was how — or if — she could follow her blockbuster with something equally striking. “There is no beating or redoing ‘21,’” said Ryan Tedder, another producer and songwriting collaborator for both “21” and “25.” “You’re lucky if at one point in your life you stumble across a unicorn in the woods. The odds that you find a second unicorn are extremely remote, and she’s aware of that. I think that ‘25’ will be enormous, regardless of anything. But that wasn’t the goal. She wanted to put out the best thing that was the most honest.”

At this rehearsal, with a journalist in the room, Adele was a musician above all. She moved decisively through new songs and old ones in preparation for TV appearances and a Radio City Music Hall concert (and NBC TV taping) on Tuesday, Nov. 17, three days before the worldwide release of “25” (XL/Columbia). And she sang in full-throated glory, capturing the vengeful bite of past hits like “Rolling in the Deep” and the hushed suspense and pealing chorus of her new one, “Hello.” Her stage arrangements echo her albums; she wants the songs familiar enough for fans to sing along.

Adele had largely maintained public silence while recording “25.” Her reticent re-emergence was a brief, anonymous television advertisement, first shown on Oct. 18 during “The X Factor” in Britain. It was the beginning of “Hello”: just somber piano chords, Adele’s voice and the lyrics — “Hello, it’s me/I was wondering if after all these years you’d like to meet” — with no other information.

Unlike most other pop hitmakers her age, Adele barely uses social media. It’s one of the many charmingly old-fashioned aspects of her career. But she does have a Twitter account, and she couldn’t resist looking online to see if her voice had been recognized. When she did, she saw only three tweets.

She panicked. “I was like, ‘Oh, no, I’ve missed my window,’” Adele said over a cup of tea a few days after the ad. “‘Oh, no, it’s too late. The comeback’s gone. No one cares.’”

But then, she recalled, her boyfriend, Simon Konecki, joined her at the computer and showed her that thousands of other tweets were pouring in. Once “Hello” was released on Oct. 23, more than 1.1 million people bought the song as a download in its first week in the United States alone, and tens of millions streamed the audio and watched the video clip.

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Adele - Hello Video by AdeleVEVO

“Hello” doesn’t just introduce “25”; in many ways, it sums up the album. On “25,” the rage and heartache of “21” are replaced by longing: for connection, for youth, for reconciliation and for lifelong bonds. Like other songs on the album, “Hello” is filled with thoughts of distance and the irrevocable passage of time, of apologies and coming to terms with the past. Musically, “Hello” has verses with just voice and piano followed by huge, ringing choruses; similarly, the album as a whole switches between organic, unplugged ballads and booming modern pop.

As she wrote the album, Adele was no longer the heartbroken avenger she had been on “21”; she had become an internationally recognized star and, at 23, a mother. In October 2012, she had a son, Angelo, with Mr. Konecki. She collaborated on writing “Skyfall,” the James Bond movie theme that would bring her an Oscar, while she was pregnant. Tattooed along her right pinky is “Angelo”; on her left pinky is “Paradise” because, she explained, “He’s my paradise.”

Adele took time to raise her infant as she pondered what to do next. “I was scared,” she admitted. “It got so out of control, the last album. I was a bit frightened for a while to step back into it.” Health problems, including a vocal hemorrhage that threatened to permanently damage her voice, had forced her to cancel extensive touring in 2011 and undergo throat surgery; regardless, “21” was a bulwark of the recorded music business throughout 2012. With “25,” she said, “I won’t do less touring than I did before, but what I did before wasn’t that much.”

Adele made her first efforts to write new songs in 2013. Initially, she said, “I didn’t think I had it in me to write another record. I didn’t know if I should. Because of how successful ‘21’ was, I thought, ‘Maybe everyone’s happy with that being the last thing from me. Maybe I should bow out on a high.’”

Photo
Adele at the Grammy Awards in 2012 with Paul Epworth, who wrote and produced songs with her on the Grammy-winning “21” as well as on her new album, “25.”

Credit Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Of course, she changed her mind. “As time went on, I realized I had no choice,” she continued. “I have to write more music for myself, and there’s nothing else I want to do.”

In an interview before rehearsal, Adele was nestled in a black leather armchair at Soho House Dean Street, an antique-filled Georgian townhouse, in a sitting room reserved by her manager to assure privacy. As Adele’s concert audiences have learned, she’s a voluble, unguarded talker, more willing to confess insecurity or ponder her duty to her fans than to promote herself. She doesn’t hide her unposh North London accent, and she cheerfully flings profanities and breaks into her melodic bark of a laugh.

She was wearing a voluminous dark-blue sweater, black Converse high tops and a pair of baggy black pants that, she admitted, were actually pajama bottoms. I joshed that she might start a trend in Britain. “It already is a bit of one,” she said, and laughed. “But for skinny people.”

Adele would not revisit the making of “21” even if she could. “I just used to let myself drown,” she said. “If I was sad, if I was confused — which I would say were the running themes for most of my records so far — I’d just go with it. I’d let myself fall apart, and I’d sit in darkness, and I’d feel sorry for myself, and I wouldn’t accept any help to get out of it, in terms of going out with my friends to cheer me up, or staying busier. No! I loved the drama of it all.”

She added: “How I felt when I wrote ‘21,’ I wouldn’t want to feel again. It was horrible. I was miserable, I was lonely, I was sad, I was angry, I was bitter. I thought I was going to be single for the rest of my life. I thought I was never going to love again. It’s not worth it.”

She reconsidered for a moment. “Well, it was worth it, because, obviously, of what’s gone on. But I’m not willing to feel like that to write a song again. I’m not.”

Now that she’s a parent, “I haven’t got time to fall apart,” she added. “I’m the backbone for my kid, and I want to be there for him. And I want to be there for my boyfriend as well, and I don’t want to bring them down with me for my art.”

Photo
Adele holding the Academy Award she won for “Skyfall.” Credit Valerie Macon/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Although she emerged to perform “Skyfall” at the 2013 Academy Awards, Adele devoted much of her time between albums to “the most normal things you could ever imagine,” she said. “I’ve been to every park, every museum, every shopping center.”

Determined to be known for music and music only, Adele also turned down endorsements and cross-marketing projects that would have kept her highly visible. “If I wanted to just be famous, like be a celebrity, then I wouldn’t do music, because everything else I’ve been offered would probably make me more famous than I am just with my music,” she said. “Commercials, being the face of brands, nail varnishes, shoes, bags, fashion lines, beauty ranges, hair products, being in movies, being the face of a car, designing watches, food ranges, buildings, airlines, book deals. I’ve been offered everything. And I don’t want to water myself down. I want to do one thing. I want to make something. I don’t want to be the face of anything.

“Everyone thinks I just disappeared, and I didn’t,” she said. “I just went back to real life, because I had to write an album about real life, because otherwise how can you be relatable? If I wrote about being famous — that’s [expletive] boring.”

Photo
Ryan Tedder, a producer and songwriting collaborator with Adele on both “21” and “25.” Credit Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Gabrielle's Angel Foundation

When she tried to start the new album in 2013, Adele came up empty. “I didn’t have a subject,” she said. She was reluctant to write about her son. “He’s the love of my life and the light of my life, but he’s no one else’s apart from me and his dad. So no one else can really relate to that. Also, all my fans aren’t parents, so they wouldn’t want to listen to that.”

Yet it was a maternal love song, “Remedy,” that restored Adele’s confidence, she said, and was the turning point for “25.” Mr. Tedder had the word “remedy,” some waltzing piano motifs and the idea that the song might be about someone beloved; he looked to Adele for the rest. “She immediately said, ‘This is about my kid,’” Mr. Tedder recalled. “That unlocked the whole lyric. And it was done, written and recorded that day.”

Adele worked with her previous producers, like Mr. Tedder and Mr. Epworth, and with new collaborators from pop’s top echelons: Sia; Bruno Mars; and the producers Greg Kurstin (Pink, Sia, Kelly Clarkson), Max Martin (Taylor Swift, the Weeknd) and Danger Mouse (Gnarls Barkley, the Black Keys).

She was resolved not to repeat “21”; she also, for the first time, discarded as many songs as she kept. “The girl has probably thrown away easily 20 hits off of ‘25’ that will at some point wander away, maybe into other artists’ hands,” Mr. Tedder said. “With Adele, it’s not about ‘Can I get a hit? Can I sing that note? Can I get with the best producers?’ It’s about, ‘What’s the story?’”

The story, in many songs on “25,” is about what to hold on to from the past and what to let go. The songs plunge into their own fears and uncertainty. “Million Years Ago,” a delicate guitar ballad with a hint of Edith Piaf, mourns lost youth and confesses, “I feel like my life is flashing by/And all I can do is watch and cry.”

At rehearsal, Adele sang “Million Years Ago” in two versions, one beginning a cappella with her voice completely alone and exposed. There were tears in that voice but not, for the moment, in her eyes.

A version of this article appears in print on November 15, 2015, on page AR1 of the New York edition with the headline: Tracks Of Her Tears. Order ReprintsToday's PaperSubscribe

 

South and North Korea Hold Talks to Defuse Border Tensions

 

By CHOE SANG-HUNAUG. 22, 2015

Photo
South Korean soldiers on Saturday near the demilitarized zone separating the country from North Korea. The nations exchanged fire on Thursday. Credit Kim Hong-Ji/Reuters

SEOUL, South Korea — South and North Korea held a high-level meeting on their border on Saturday, South Korean officials said, apparently easing, at least temporarily, a tense standoff that has prevailed since the countries exchanged artillery fire two days ago.

The meeting took place at the border village of Panmunjom, said Kim Kyou-hyun, a senior aide to President Park Geun-hye of South Korea. Mr. Kim said it included top policy makers from both sides: Kim Kwan-jin, Ms. Park’s senior national security adviser, and Vice Marshal Hwang Pyong-so, North Korea’s most powerful military officer after Kim Jong-un, the supreme leader, who holds the rank of marshal.

North Korea confirmed in a brief statement that the two sides had agreed to meet. Its state-run news media, reporting on the talks, did something it had not done for several years, raising hopes for the border meeting: It referred to South Korea by its official name, the Republic of Korea, instead of using the North’s standard derogatory reference to “South Korean puppets.”

Photo
South Korean soldiers adjusting barricades Saturday on a bridge near the border village of Panmunjom, where officials from both Koreas were expected to meet. Credit Ahn Young-Joon/Associated Press

The announcement came just hours before a 5 p.m. deadline that North Korea had given South Korea to stop broadcasting propaganda messages from loudspeakers placed along the heavily militarized border, and the talks began shortly after the deadline. The North had threatened “strong military action” unless the broadcasts stopped.

South Korean officials said that Unification Minister Hong Yong-pyo of South Korea and Kim Yang-gon, a senior North Korean Workers’ Party secretary in charge of relations with the South, had also taken part in the meeting.

On Thursday, the two Koreas exchanged fire across their border. No casualties were reported, but it was their most serious clash in five years.

South Korean officials said they believed that the North had begun firing as a warning to stop the loudspeaker broadcasts. The South had resumed the broadcasts, a propaganda tactic dating from the Cold War, this month after 11 years, in response to the maiming of two South Korean border guards by land mines that the South accused the North of planting.

Kim Kyou-hyun, the South Korean presidential aide, said that discussions about meeting at Panmunjom had begun Friday, when Kim Yang-gon, the North Korean official, suggested it in a message to the South.

It was the first high-level dialogue between the Koreas since February 2014, apart from an informal meeting in October after Vice Marshal Hwang and other North Korean officials made a surprise decision to attend the Asian Games in the South.

In Washington, a White House official said President Obama had been briefed on the meeting.

The talks were expected to focus on the issue of the loudspeakers. The South has said it will not stop the propaganda broadcasts unless the North apologizes for planting the land mines that wounded the South Korean soldiers and punishes those responsible. North Korea has denied planting the mines; it has also denied starting the exchange of fire on Thursday, accusing the South of fabricating both episodes to divert attention from scandals that have plagued Ms. Park’s government.

The New York Times Headline Updates For The Month Of July

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    Reuters
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    Writing thank you notes to #harperlee at the #monroevillebookstore. http://t.co/cGtkeSdETW

    A Times correspondent in Monroeville, Ala., Harper Lee's hometown, where the author's new novel "Go Set a Watchman" was released at midnight, via Twitter
  • I stole them in July 1995 and since then they have brought me nothing but trouble.

    From an anonymous note left at an Israeli museum with two sling stones, which the writer claimed to have taken from the ancient site of Gamla, via Haaretz
  • Laura Poitras, who won an Oscar for her film about Edward J. Snowden, “Citizenfour,” sued several U.S. agencies, saying that airport security officials harassed her for years.

    The New York Times
  • South Korea said two North Korean fishermen who drifted into its waters had been sent home. Three others who asked to defect remained, despite Pyongyang’s protests.

    The Associated Press
  • July 13, 2015
  • A Pennsylvania court rejected an inmate’s claim that he was not responsible for paying for medical treatment that the state forced on him while he was staging a hunger strike.

    Reuters
  • Two Moroccan women were acquitted of indecency charges for wearing short skirts in public, their lawyer said. Thousands had signed a petition supporting them.

    Agence France-Presse, via The Guardian
  • CHRISTIAN VON ESCHENBACH/THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS MEDICAL BRANCH

    A single dose of a new Ebola vaccine that can be inhaled has been found to neutralize the deadly virus in monkeys, a study said.

    The New York Times
  • Dez Bryant, a star wide receiver for the Dallas Cowboys, suggested on Twitter that he would decline to play if a deal is not reached soon on a long-term contract.

    Twitter
  • The New York State paleontologist is answering reader questions about fossils and prehistoric life in the state. She is responding in the comments.

    The New York Times
  • Lena Headey of “Game of Thrones” and HBO’s John Oliver are joining the voice cast of the BBC’s animated series ”Danger Mouse.” 

    Variety
  • CHARLES KRUPA/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    A proposed class-action lawsuit was filed against Major League Baseball accusing it of doing too little to protect fans from being injured by balls and splintered bats. 

    The New York Times
  • Netflix’s share price set a new record ahead of the company’s second-quarter earnings report, which is due July 15 after the market closes. Shares reached $716.16.

    Quartz
  • A former volunteer sheriff’s deputy in Oklahoma who says he confused his handgun and stun gun when he killed an unarmed, restrained man will face a jury trial in February.

    The Associated Press
  • CHRISTOPHER LEE FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

    A bicyclist was killed and three passengers in an S.U.V. were injured in a crash that involved three vehicles near the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, authorities said.

    The New York Times
  • Curtis James Jackson III, the rapper known as50 Centfiled for bankruptcy protection. He has assets and debts each in the range of $10 million to $50 million, court papers said.

    The Wall Street Journal
  • Berkeley Breathed, the Pulitzer Prize-winning creator and artist of “Bloom County,” has revived his vintage 1980s strip on his Facebook page after a hiatus of about 25 years.

    The New York Times
  • China and North Korea will open a border trade zone in the northeastern Chinese city of Dandong, China’s state news media said. It is expected to open in October.

    Reuters
  • REUTERS

    Iraqi troops backed by mainly Shiite Muslim militias have started operations to recapture Anbar Province from Islamic State militants, a military statement said.

    Reuters
  • Malaysia is investigating whether government officials leaked records said to show hundreds of millions of dollars in transfers to Prime Minister Najib Razak and his wife.

    The New York Times
  • Prosecutors in Romania temporarily seized the assets of Prime Minister Victor Ponta after indicting him in a corruption investigation.

    The New York Times
  • Prince William started a new job as an air ambulance pilot on Monday. The prince, who is second in line to the British throne, will donate his salary to charity.

    The New York Times
  • ANTHONY WALLACE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE — GETTY IMAGES

    China has detained dozens of lawyers, accusing some of undermining the ruling party, dealing a blow to the “rights defense” movement that had sought to expand civic rights.

    The New York Times
  • Follow

    I'm in. I'm running for president because Americans deserve a leader who will fight and win for them. - SWhttp://t.co/DZG253QjfP #Walker16

    The governor of Wisconsin becomes the 15th prominent Republican to enter the 2016 race, via Twitter
  • THIBAULT CAMUS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    A group of gunmen broke into a discount clothing store near Paris, trapping 18 people inside for hours before fleeing and prompting a manhunt, the police said.

    The Associated Press
  • The United Arab Emirates executed an Abu Dhabi woman with links to Islamic extremists who was convicted of murdering an American teacher in a local mall last year.

    The Associated Press
  • Tenzin Delek Rinpoche, a prominent Tibetan religious leader, has died in a Chinese prison, according to a family member and a Tibetan exile group.

    The New York Times
  • Cambodia’s legislature passed a law, criticized by the United Nations, that empowers the government to shut down nongovernmental organizations on vague grounds.

    The Cambodia Daily
  • Follow

    EuroSummit has unanimously reached agreement. All ready to go for ESM programme for #Greece with serious reforms & financial support

    The president of the European Council, via Twitter
  • PETER MACDIARMID/GETTY IMAGES

    Climate change demonstrators cut through a fence atHeathrow Airport and protested on a runway, disrupting flights. Above, police surround protestors on the ground.

    The Guardian
  • Follow

    Iran state TV is reporting "an announcement" on a 'Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action" to resolve the nuclear dispute will be made today.

    The Times's Tehran bureau chief, via Twitter
  • Alaska is beginning a large-scale cleanup of debris from its shores, some of it thought to be from the tsunami that struck Japan in 2011.

    The Associated Press
  • China’s benchmark stock index rallied for a third day, as more companies resumed trading after last week’s turmoil and trade data exceeded expectations.

    Bloomberg News
  • July 10, 2015
  • McDonald’s denied accusations that its Happy Meal toys from the animated film “Minions”use foul language and said there were no plans to pull them from distribution.

    Reuters
  • Mike Moustakas of the Kansas City Royals and Carlos Martinez of the St. Louis Cardinals won the final fan votes and will go to the All-Star Game.

    MLB.com
  • Yanis Varoufakis, the former Greek finance minister, wrote in an op-ed that creditors have refused to offer essential debt relief because of politics, not economics.

    The Guardian
  • CHUCK BURTON/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Dalvin Cook, a sophomore starting running back for Florida State, was charged with misdemeanor battery and suspended from the football team. 

    Tallahassee Democrat
  • Characters on “The Simpsons” are often seen guzzling Duff Beer. Now 21st Century Fox, the media company, will sell a real-life version of the brew, starting in Chile.

    The Wall Street Journal
  • The N.F.L. reduced its suspension for Greg Hardy, a Dallas Cowboys defensive end, from 10 games to four. He was suspended for his involvement in a domestic violence case.

    The New York Times
  • LeBron James signed a one-year contract with the Cleveland Cavaliers on Friday. The deal has a player option for the 2016-17 season.

    Northeast Ohio Media Group
  • The presidents of Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone appealed for $3.2 billion to help the Ebola-hit countries recover from the epidemic.

    The Associated Press
  • The defense rested its case in the trial of James E. Holmes, who is charged with killing 12 people in a Colorado theater in 2012. Closing arguments are set to begin Tuesday.

    The Denver Post
  • Farid Fata, a Michigan doctor, was sentenced to 45 years in prison for a Medicare fraud scheme that involved givingchemotherapy to patients who did not have cancer.

    The Detroit News
  • General Motors said it was recalling nearly 780,000 crossover SUVs, mainly in North America, because their rearpower lift gates could fall and hit people.

    Reuters
  • Watch

    Japan’s new satellite captures an image every 10 minutes, painting a living portrait of Earth. On its first official day, the weather systems shown include typhoons spinning in the western Pacific.

  • McDonald’s said it had no plans to stop distributing a talking Happy Meal toy inspired by the movie “Minions,” even though some customers said it sounds as if it is cursing.

    The Associated Press
  • SHAUN BOTTERILL/GETTY IMAGES

    Novak Djokovic, above, defeated Richard Gasquet, 7-6 (2), 6-4, 6-4, to advance to his fourth Wimbledon final.

    The New York Times
  • An appeals court upheld the conviction of Bob McDonnell, the former governor of Virginia, who was convicted last year of bribery and corruption.

    The Virginian-Pilot
  • Tunisia’s Interior Ministry said security forces had killed five suspected extremists. The operation came after agunman killed 38 tourists at a resort in June.

    The Associated Press
  • The police detained one of China’s most prominent human rights lawyers in Beijing, after an additional three rights lawyers disappeared in the capital within 24 hours.

    The New York Times
  • NEWSHA TAVAKOLIAN/MAGNUM, FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

    Thousands of people chanted “Down with America” and “Death to Israel” in annual rallies in Iran, as Iran and six nations held talks in Vienna on its nuclear program.

    The Associated Press
  • China’s military will prosecute another former senior officer for corruption, the Defense Ministry said, part of a campaign that has already targeted dozens of top people.

    Reuters
  • MICHEL SPINGLER/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Pilots flew two electric planes, one made by Airbus, across the English Channel for the first time, journeys seen as a step toward making such flights viable in the long term.

    The Associated Press
  • Follow

    Teleconference at 1pm between @JunckerEU@Lagarde,@J_Dijsselbloem and Draghi on Greece proposal.@tsipras_eu #eurogroup

    A Times correspondent on a meeting between top European officials to discuss the Greek debt crisis, via Twitter
  • German police arrested a man in Bavaria suspected ofshooting dead a woman from his Mercedes convertible, and then fatally shooting a cyclist.

    Reuters
  • Tunisia’s prime minister said his country did “everything in our power” to protect tourists, after Britain said another attack was likely and urged its citizens to leave.

    The Associated Press
  • Citing concerns about music rights, the BBC has halted playing anything by Neil Young, the Doors, Journey or Bonnie Raitt — or even songs that sample their work.

    The Guardian
  • Trying to address a housing shortage, Britain will announce new rules that include automatic approval for developments on land once used for industrial purposes.

    Reuters
  • Rainfall last month appears to have “considerably eased”North Korea’s drought, but key rice-producing areas are still afflicted, South Korea’s Unification Ministry said.

    Agence France-Presse, via The Straits Times
  • Follow

    A group of kids carrying a banner saying: "resistance until victory." http://t.co/uISpT59z6V

    The Times's Tehran bureau chief, covering annual protests against Israel and other perceived enemies of Iran, via Twitter
  • United Airlines is investigating an incident in June in which a pilot dumped live ammunition down a toilet during a flight to Munich from Houston.

    CNN
  • We are not criminals. They don’t really need to follow us like this. I feel very unsafe indeed.

    Panupong Sritananuwat, one of 14 Thai students recently jailed for protesting military rule, who said security personnel had shadowed them since their release this week, via The Nation
  • A North Korean pesticide factory recently visited by Kim Jong-un could be used to make “military-size batches of anthrax,” the website 38 North reported.

    The New York Times
  • At least 17 people were killed in a stampede at a Bangladeshi factory compound where free clothes were being given away, the police said.

    Agence France-Presse, via The Straits Times
  • McDonald’s denied that a talking “Minions” toy included in Happy Meals uses curse words, though “a very small number of customers” have complained that it does.

    The Associated Press
  • July 09, 2015
  • Shepard Fairey, a street artist and creator of the Barack Obama “Hope” poster, was arrested in Los Angeles. He was wanted in Detroit for property crimes.

    The Detroit News
  • Tom Selleck, the actor, reached a tentative settlement with a water district over allegations that he stole truckloads of water from a hydrant in drought-racked California.

    The Los Angeles Times
  • The N.C.A.A. lifted a 14-year ban on holding championship events in South Carolina after the governor signed a law to remove the Confederate flag from the Capitol.

    The State (Columbia, S.C.)
  • KAREN BLEIER/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE — GETTY IMAGES

    The F.D.A. is strengthening its warning labels for pain relievers like ibuprofen, adding information about the risk of heart attack and stroke.

    NBC News
  • Two new cases of Ebola were reported in Liberia in the same community where the virus recently resurged, officials said. There are now five confirmed cases.

    The Associated Press
  • Wisconsin lawmakers passed a ban on abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. The bill heads to Gov. Scott Walker.

    Wisconsin State Journal
  • The F.B.I. director said the authorities thwarted plots to kill people in the U.S. around July 4 and in recent weeks arrested more than 10 people inspired by the Islamic State.

    Reuters
  • Ray McDonald, a former N.F.L. player, wascharged with felony domestic violenceafter what the police said was a clash with his ex-fiancée and their infant child in May.

    San Jose Mercury News
  • The Saudi-backed government of Yemen agreed to a “pause” in fighting, starting Friday, so that humanitarian relief can be delivered, a U.N. spokesman said.

    The New York Times
  • The New York Times’s Jim Yardley answered questions from readers about his travels with Pope Francis in Ecuador, Bolivia and Paraguay. 

    Facebook
  • SAM HODGSON FOR THE NEW YORK TIMES

    The Food and Drug Administration pushed back the deadline for chain restaurants, pizza parlors and movie theaters to post calorie counts on their menus to December 2016.

    The New York Times
  • Most of Florida’s congressional districts will have to be redrawn before next year’s elections after a ruling from the state’s highest court.

    The Associated Press
  • The Italian oil field contractor Saipem said Gazprom, the Russian gas exporter, had canceled its contract to build a natural gas pipeline under the Black Sea.

    The New York Times
  • New studies say rats and monkeys whose brains are linked by electrodes can coordinate their brains to carry out tasks, often better than individuals do.

    The New York Times
  • The number of people who applied for U.S. jobless benefits last week jumped to 297,000, the highest level since February, mainly because of shutdowns at auto plants.

    MarketWatch
  • The consumer products giant Procter & Gamble has agreed to sell its portfolio of 43 beauty brands to the beauty products maker Coty for $12.5 billion, the companies said.

    The New York Times
  • FU XINHUA

    A program inviting Chinese city dwellers to visit an enclosure in Shanghai with thousands of fireflies inside was suspended over fears of ecological damage and safety concerns.

    The New York Times
  • Dragan Vasiljkovic, a Serbian ex-commander accused of war crimes in Croatia in the 1990s, arrived in Zagreb to face trial after failing to stop his extradition from Australia.

    Reuters
  • European antitrust officials filed formal charges against MasterCard, accusing the company of setting artificially high fees for credit card transactions in the European Union.

    The New York Times
  • India’s top court ordered an inquiry into a multimillion-dollar college admission and government job recruitment scandal said to be linked to dozens of mysterious deaths.

    The Associated Press
  • STEFAN ROUSSEAU/PRESS ASSOCIATION

    London Tube employees are on strike, forcing the first total shutdown of the rail network in 13 years and causing chaos for commuters across the city.

    The Telegraph
  • The Nigerian military said it had arrested a suspect who is believed to have planned Boko Haram attacks in the cities of Jos and Zaria that killed more than 70 people.

    News24
  • North Korea has carried out 70 executions since Kim Jong-un took power in 2011, South Korea’s foreign minister said. He did not say where he had gotten the information.

    The Associated Press
  • BULENT KILIC/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE — GETTY IMAGES

    Over four million Syrians have fled the war-ravaged country, the U.N. said. A senior official called it “the biggest refugee population from a single conflict in a generation.”

    The New York Times
  • Thailand confirmed that it had sent ethnic Uighurs back to China, despite concerns for their safety. Earlier in Istanbul, protesters stormed the Thai consulate over the news.

    The Associated Press | Daily Sabah
  • DeAndre Jordan re-signed with the Los Angeles Clippers, reneging on an oral commitment to Dallas and ending nearly 12 hours of suspense and ridiculousness.

    The New York Times
  • A fashion blogger who claimed to be a stylist for Johnny Depp and others, and who bought expensive clothes in Manhattan purportedly on their behalf, avoided prison with a plea deal.

    The New York Times
  • General Motors is recalling nearly 200,000 Hummers because of an electrical problem that could cause a fire inside the dashboard, the automaker said.

    The New York Times
  • July 08, 2015
  • Poverty may be down worldwide, but more than half the world’s population were classified as “low-income” in 2011, meaning they live on $2 to $10 a day, a study said.

    The New York Times
  • DAMON WINTER/THE NEW YORK TIMES

    An inexpensive, little-known cholera vaccine appears to work so well that it can protect entire communities and perhaps head off explosive epidemics, a new study said.

    The New York Times
  • JPMorgan Chase will pay $136 million to settle charges that it used illegal tactics to go after delinquent credit card borrowers, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said.

    The Associated Press
  • José Andrés, the Washington-based chef, said he isbacking out of a deal to open a restaurant in a Donald Trump hotel in protest over his anti-immigrant comments.

    The Washington Post
  • In drought-hit California, Los Angeles announced a plan toincrease rates for water, charging heavy users more than residents who use less water.

    The Los Angeles Times
  • AMEL EMRIC/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Russia vetoed a draft resolution in the U.N. Security Council condemning the 1995 Srebrenica massacre as a “crime of genocide.” Above, a memorial site near the town.

    The New York Times
  • A court in Italy sentenced Silvio Berlusconi,the former prime minister, to three years in jail for bribery, but he will not have to serve his time because of a statute of limitations.

    Reuters
  • A federal judge threw out a $533 million award that Apple was told in February to pay to a patent owner over iTunes software. The judge ordered a new trial on the damages.

    Bloomberg News
  • The N.F.L. has agreed to play at least two games a year for 10 years in London at the new stadium for Tottenham Hotspur, a Premier League club, beginning in 2018.

    The New York Times
  • Taco Bell is testing delivery service at 200 stores in California and Texas, becoming the latest fast-food chain to consider expanding into delivery.

    USA Today
  • Rory McIlroy, the world’s top-ranked golfer, said he will not play in next week’s British Open after injuring his ankle while playing soccer last week.

    ESPN
  • COMEDY CENTRAL, VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Comedy Central renewed “South Park,” the cartoon written and directed by Trey Parker and Matt Stone since 1997, for three more seasons through 2019.  

    Entertainment Weekly
  • United Airlines grounded planes nationwide on Wednesday for about two hours because of what the company said was a computer glitch.

    The New York Times
  • A federal judge upheld the cancellation of theWashington Redskins’ federal trademark registrations in a legal and symbolic setback for the N.F.L. team.

    The Washington Post
  • A county water district has accused Tom Selleck, the actor, of stealing truckloads of water from a hydrant in drought-racked California, according to court documents.

    The Los Angeles Times
  • PLAY VIDEO
    VINCENT KESSLER/REUTERS

    Europe’s divisions were clear as Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras of Greece asked for solidarity from the European Parliament and his detractors criticized Greece.

    DW (German television) English via YouTube
  • 24-hour strike by 20,000 London Underground workers is set to begin at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday and is expected to significantly disrupt travel.

    The Telgraph
  • Walt Disney World is removing a Bill Cosby statue from its Hollywood Studios theme park in Florida, a spokeswoman said.

    Orlando Sentinel
  • KATHY WILLENS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    New York City will allow judges to replace bail with supervision options for suspects accused of low-level or nonviolent crimes, according to an $18 million city plan.

    The Associated Press
  • In a subtle change, Facebook redesigned its “friends” logo to put the woman, formerly behind the man, in front.

    The Verge
  • Julie Hamp, the American Toyota executive who resigned after being arrested in Japan on suspicion of importing a restricted painkiller, was released without charges.

    The Associated Press
  • Two Britons making their second attempt to row across the Indian Ocean were rescued for a second time after running into bad weather.

    Australian Associated Press, via The Guardian
  • ATHIT PERAWONGMETHA/REUTERS

    Two Burmese migrants charged with killing two British tourists went on trial in Thailand. The men retracted their confessions, saying they were beaten by the police.

    The Associated Press
  • July 07, 2015
  • Juli Soler, a restaurateur who helped turn El Bulli in Spain into one of the world’s most daring and influential restaurants, died at 66.

    The New York Times
  • Time Warner Cable must pay a woman $229,500 for placing153 automated calls meant for someone else to her cellphone in less than a year, a judge ruled.

    Reuters
  • A “Star Wars” spinoff about the life of a young Han Solo will be directed by Christopher Miller and Phil Lord, the duo that helmed “The Lego Movie” and “21 Jump Street.”

    Variety
  • SUE OGROCKI/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Gov. Mary Fallin said a Ten Commandments monumentwould remain at the Oklahoma Capitol despite a court ruling that said it was unconstitutional and should be removed.

    Tulsa World
  • Baylor University, a private school in Texas and the world’s largest Baptist university, dropped a ban on “homosexual acts” in its sexual conduct policy.

    Houston Chronicle
  • The F.B.I. seized a child pornography website with nearly 215,000 users in February, according to a newly unsealed search warrant.

    Reuters
  • Whipclip, an app that aims to make it easier to share clips from TV shows, raised $40 million in a round of financing.

    The New York Times
  • More than a year after the Ebola epidemic, the World Health Organization remains unfit to handle a public health emergency, an independent panel said in a report.

    The New York Times
  • Heroin use has doubled among women over a decade and has grown by 60 percent among those with annual household incomes over $50,000, a new report shows.

    USA Today
  • The number of unaccompanied minors entering the U.S.dropped 54 percent from a year ago, officials said. Most of the crossings occurred in southern Texas.

    Reuters
  • Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed a bill requiring universities in New York to adopt a ”yes means yes” standard for sexual consent, as part of a movement to curb sexual assault.

    Reuters
  • Gov. Sam Brownback of Kansas issued an executive order that protects clergy members from “discriminatory action” if they deny services for a same-sex wedding.

    The Wichita Eagle
  • Harry Shearer, the voice of Mr. Burns, Ned Flanders and other iconic characters on “The Simpsons,” will return to the show after departing in May, Fox announced.

    The New York Times
  • Dylann Roof, the suspect in the June 17 massacre at Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, was indicted on nine counts of murder and other charges, prosecutors said.

    The New York Times
  • PLAY VIDEO
    PETER MACDIARMID/GETTY IMAGES

    Britain mourned the 52 civilians killed 10 years ago when four suicide bombers linked to Al Qaeda detonated explosives on a London bus and on three subway trains.

    The New York Times
  • Follow

    BREAKING: The South Carolina Senate has given final approval to a plan to remove the Confederate battle flag from the State House grounds.

    The bill now moves to the South Carolina House, where it is likely to face a tougher battle. via Twitter
  • REUTERS

    At least 14 people were killed and 11 were wounded in an attack in northeast Kenya by the Shabab, an Islamist group from neighboring Somalia, a Kenyan official said.

    The Associated Press
  • Government measures to bolster the stock market in China are offering little relief. The Shanghai composite index closed down 1.3 percent after a gain on Monday.

    The New York Times
  • Three North Korean sailors defected to South Koreaafter their ship strayed into South Korean waters over the weekend, the government in Seoul said.

    The New York Times
  • French authorities are investigating the theft of about 200 detonators, as well as grenades and plastic explosives, from a military base in southeast France.

    The Associated Press
  • A migrant has died trying to reach Britain through the Channel Tunnel on a freight train; hundreds of migrantshave been desperately trying to cross over from France.

    Sky News
  • Follow

    BREAKING: Shanghai benchmark index ends 1.26% lower, with 1600+ stocks falling 10% daily down-limit; biggest gainers: state banks, oil firms

    A South China Morning Post editor, via Twitter
  • Chinese construction in disputed South China Sea waters “is the worst thing that has happened to coral reefs in our lifetime,” an American marine biologist said.

    The Washington Post
  • They need these sort of tournaments to become competitive in future.

    Stan Foster, coach of Micronesia's men's soccer team, which gave up 114 goals in three games at the Pacific Games in Papua New Guinea, via Radio New Zealand
  • Fourteen Thai students detained for almost two weeks after protesting military rule were released, but they still face sedition charges, a defense lawyer said.

    Reuters
  • COURTESY OF XIE SHI

    In China’s western region of Xinjiang, where tensions between Uighur and Han people run high, a photographer found a skateboarding culture that crossed ethnic lines.

    The New York Times
  • A hiker was killed and four others were injured when an ice cave partly collapsed in Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest east of Seattle, the authorities said.

    The Seattle Times
  • HSBC said it fired six staff members in Britain who staged a mock execution video. The Sun said the video was made during a team-building exercise and posted online.

    The Telegraph | The Sun
  • Sakari Momoi, who Guinness World Records said was the world’s oldest man, died at 112. His successor to the title, also Japanese, is about a month younger, a U.S. group said.

    Agence France-Presse, via Yahoo News
  • July 06, 2015
  • MARK KAUZLARICH/THE NEW YORK TIMES

    The reserves and pitchers for the M.L.B. All-Star teams were announced, with Alex Rodriguez among the notable omissions. The game will be held on July 14.

    ESPN
  • The U.S. government will pay $1.3 million to the family of a baby who died at a Hawaii military hospital in a settlement of a medical malpractice lawsuit.

    The Associated Press
  • When Michael R. Bloomberg’s daughter, Emma, gave birth this spring, she and her husband, Chris Frissora, combined their surnames in naming Zelda Violet Frissberg.

    The New York Times
  • New York City agreed to pay more than $330,000 to sixOccupy Wall Street protesters who said a police officer doused them with pepper spray without cause in 2011.

    Reuters
  • The bacterium responsible for the Black Death probably caused small outbreaks of lung disease for thousands of years before it evolved its better-known form, a study said.

    The New York Times
  • A man in Calgary was charged after riding into the sky on a lawn chair with more than 100 helium balloons attached. He sustained minor injuries in a crash landing.

    The Toronto Star
  • ESPN said it would relocate a celebrity golf tournament from a course owned by Donald Trump following his inflammatory comments about Mexican immigrants.

    Variety
  • Lawyers for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who was sentenced to death for the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, filed a preliminary motion for a new trial “in the interests of justice.”

    NECN (Massachusetts)
  • Ellen Pao, Reddit’s chief executive, apologized to the online message board’s users for what she characterized as a history of broken promises and poor communication.

    The New York Times
  • POOL PHOTO BY JOHN G. MABANGLO

    Manu Ginobili said he would return to the San Antonio Spurs for another season. The 37-year-old guard has spent 13 years with the team.

    SB Nation
  • Follow

    The South Carolina Senate has rejected a proposal for a statewide referendum on the Confederate battle flag outside the State House.

    A Times reporter, via Twitter
  • GoPro introduced a smaller, easier to use action camera that will go on sale on July 12, part of its strategy to maintain dominance of the action-camera market.

    Bloomberg News
  • RICH LAM/GETTY IMAGES

    The United States victory over Japan on Sunday in theWomen’s World Cup final has set a new ratings high for a soccer telecast in the U.S., Fox Sports reported.

    Variety
  • The European Union’s top prosecutor said she has been told that smugglers’ boats bringing migrants across the Mediterranean to Europe are also carrying ISIS fighters.

    The Associated Press
  • MASSOUD HOSSAINI/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Dozens of Afghans protested a court ruling that overturned death sentences for four men convicted of taking part in the mob killing of a woman outside a Kabul shrine.

    The Associated Press
  • Waze, the online mapping company owned by Google, is starting a carpooling pilot program in Israel where commuters pay drivers a fee for a ride to and from work.

    Reuters
  • PATRICK SMITH/GETTY IMAGES

    Dale Earnhardt Jr. won the Coke Zero 400 at the Nascar Daytona speedway Monday, where Austin Dillon crashed. Mr. Dillon walked away but a fan was treated in the hospital.

    USA Today
  • An Iraqi fighter jet, made by Russia, accidentally dropped a bomb over a Baghdad neighborhood, killing at least 12 people on the ground, Iraqi officials said.

    The Associated Press
  • WATCH VIDEO AT REUTERS
    POOL PHOTO BY MATT DUNHAM

    Princess Charlotte, the baby daughter of Prince William and his wife, Kate, was christened on Sunday. It was the family’s first public outing together since her birth in May.

    Reuters
  • Rory McIlroy, the top-ranked golfer, said he suffered a ”total rupture” of an ankle ligament while playing soccer with friends on Saturday.

    Instagram
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    Francis can start his messaging today, so things to look for: Environment? Will he talk about oil exploration plans in Ecuador? The Amazon?

    The Times's Rome bureau chief, who is following the pope on his trip to South America, via Twitter
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    After days of pessimism Iran state TV now hinting nuclear deal is coming: "The Americans have compromised on their own redlines."

    The Times's Tehran bureau chief, via Twitter
  • A Singapore court sentenced Amos Yee, a teenager who criticized the late Lee Kuan Yew online, to four weeks’ detention, which he has already served. He was expected to go free.

    The New York Times
  • Jane Aaron, a filmmaker who died last month at 67, made nearly 200 animated shorts on “Sesame Street” introducing children to letters, numbers and other concepts.

    The New York Times
  • Bombs went off at a crowded mosque and a restaurantin the Nigerian city of Jos, killing 44 people, witnesses said.

    The Associated Press
  • I shall support fully Prime Minister Tsipras, the new minister of finance and our government.

    Yanis Varoufakis, announcing on his blog that he would resign from his post as Greece's finance minister to help Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras reach a better deal in negotiations with the nation's creditors
  • The head of Thailand’s army dismissed calls to release 14 students who are being held for protesting military rule.

    Reuters
  • FERNANDO RUIZ/ARCHIE COMICS

    In an effort to mirror changing attitudes, publishers are promoting a wider selection of gay-themed comic books.

    The New York Times
  • Burt Shavitz, the co-founder of Burt’s Bees, whose products bore his name and likeness, died at 80. The cosmetics company said he had “left for greener fields and wilder woods.”

    USA Today
  • July 02, 2015
  • A U.S. Army soldier admitted in federal court that he took$100,000 in cash bribes from vendors seeking contracts while he was in Afghanistan, prosectors said.

    Reuters
  • Testing children’s reactions to pleasant and unpleasant odors may help diagnose autism, a new study suggests.

    The New York Times
  • A woman died from measles in Washington State, officials said. It is the first measles death in the U.S. in 12 years.

    USA Today
  • The N.F.L. suspended Antonio Gates, the San Diego Chargers tight end, for four games for violating the league’s policy on performance-enhancing drugs.

    ESPN
  • Dollar Tree and Family Dollar agreed to sell 330 Family Dollar stores to settle F.T.C. charges that a merger would likely be anticompetitive.

    The New York Times
  • PLAY VIDEO
    PRODUCED BY CAITLIN PRENTKE AND SAM SIFTON

    A recipe for guacamole with peas didn’t go over all that well with some of our readers. The Times’s food editor, Sam Sifton, reads some of the mean tweets.

    The New York Times
  • STEVE BOUSER/THE PILOT, VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS

    After a series of shark attacks off North Carolina’s coast, Gov. Pat McCrory said officials are trying to find ways to keep the key tourism region safe for visitors.

    The New York Times
  • In a setback for interns, an appeals court vacated a previous ruling in favor of two men who said their unpaid work on the movie “Black Swan” violated laws.

    The Hollywood Reporter
  • Mayor Muriel Bowser and other officials, speaking about the lockdown at the Washington Navy Yard, said there was no evidence of a gunman or that shots were fired.

    The New York Times
  • Five United Nations peacekeepers were killed and six were severely wounded in an attack on their convoy in northern Mali, a spokeswoman said.

    Reuters
  • MASSOUD HOSSAINI/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    An Afghan court has overturned the death sentences of four men convicted in the lynching of a woman falsely accused of burning the Quran, a lawyer and a politician said.

    The New York Times
  • The Washington Navy Yard was locked down after reports that shots were fired. Roads were closed, and workers were told to stay in place. The Navy said it was investigating.

    The New York Times
  • A poll shows that 57 percent of white Americans see the Confederate flag more as a symbol of Southern pride than of racism, and 72 percent of blacks see it as racist.

    CNN
  • The Shanghai Composite Index in China fell 3.5 percentamid doubts over government measures to support equities.

    Bloomberg News
  • Lee Wan-koo, who resigned as South Korea’s prime minister in April, was indicted on charges of accepting illegal campaign fundsfrom a businessman who later killed himself.

    The New York Times
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    So, @yanisvaroufakis tells @BloombergTV he'll resign in case of 'Yes' vote in referendum. What about @tsipras_eu ?

    A journalist covering the Greek crisis for The New York Times in Athens, referring to the finance minister and prime minister, via Twitter
  • Law enforcement officials in Switzerland said they received a formal request from the United States to extradite seven FIFA officials who were arrested in May.

    The Associated Press
  • A woman with amnesia, whose identity perplexed the F.B.I., Interpol and thousands of amateur sleuths, was identified after her nephew saw an online news report.

    The Sydney Morning Herald
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    BREAKING: Boat capsizes in the Philippines with 173 on board. Search and rescue operations underway

    A Channel News Asia correspondent in the Philippines, via Twitter
  • Another shark attack has been reported on the Outer Banks of North Carolina, the state’s seventh this year. The victim survived despite being pulled underwater.

    USA Today
  • The police in England are treating the death of John “Goldfinger” Palmer, a convicted con man thought to have died as a result of natural causes, as a murder inquiry.

    The Telegraph
  • Most children in Syria now work to support their families, Save the Children and Unicef said. Before the war, nearly all who were old enough went to school.

    The New York Times
  • THIBAULT CAMUS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

    In the French port of Calais, a strike by ferry workers has become tangled in Europe’s migration crisis, as drivers say their idled trucks have been besieged by migrants.

    The New York Times
  • The military plane that crashed into an Indonesian city, killing more than 140, had a propeller “abnormality”indicating a stalled engine, the air force chief said.

    The Associated Press
  • The Securities and Exchange Commission proposed a rule that would let companies take bonuses back from senior executives if they were based on flawed accounting.

    The New York Times
  • Billy Joel set a Madison Square Garden record with his 65th show there Wednesday night. No single artist has performed there more often.

    The Associated Press
  • We in Rakhine state hate Aung San Suu Kyi. She has spoken out too strongly for the Muslims, and blamed us unfairly.

    San Thar Aung, a Buddhist in Myanmar, on the opposition leader, who has been criticized by rights groups for not speaking out for persecuted Muslims, via The Wall Street Journal
  • Two weeks after the killings there, Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, S.C., is still drawing visitors day and night, and an outdoor memorial to the victims continues to grow.

    The New York Times
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